Tuesday, 25 October 2011

Mammals

Mammals are warm-blooded animals.  They normally are covered with fur and hair.  
The female mammals suckle their young ones with their own supply of milk.
Mammals have a well defined structure of sences.
Most mammals including whales, bats, giraffes, hippopotamuses and human beings are placentals. Young placentals grow inside their mother's body for a long time before they are born.They are nourished through a special organ called the placenta which develops within the mother's body.

Examples:

 Bat


 Rhinoceros


 Zebra


 Tiger


Elephant

Classifying Living Things

Vertebrates are animals with backbones such as :

Fish
Fish are a paraphyletic group of organisms that consist of all gill-bearing aquatic vertebrate (or craniate) animals that lack limbs with digits. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish, as well as various extinct related groups. Most fish are ectothermic ("cold-blooded"), allowing their body temperatures to vary as ambient temperatures change, though some of the large active swimmers like white shark and tuna can hold a higher core temperature. Fish are abundant in most bodies of water. They can be found in nearly all aquatic environments, from high mountain streams (e.g., char and gudgeon) to the abyssal and even hadal depths of the deepest oceans (e.g., gulpers and anglerfish). At 32,000 species, fish exhibit greater species diversity than any other class of vertebrates.
Fish, especially as food, are an important resource worldwide. Commercial and subsistence fishers hunt fish in wild fisheries (see fishing) or farm them in ponds or in cages in the ocean (see aquaculture). They are also caught by recreational fishers, kept as pets, raised by fishkeepers, and exhibited in publicaquaria. Fish have had a role in culture through the ages, serving as deities, religious symbols, and as the subjects of art, books and movies.
Because the term "fish" is defined negatively, and excludes the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) which descend from within the same ancestry, it is paraphyletic, and is not considered a proper grouping in systematic biology. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification.
The earliest organisms that can be classified as fish were soft-bodied chordates that first appeared during the Cambrian period. Although they lacked a true spine, they possessed notochords which allowed them to be more agile than their invertebrate counterparts. Fish would continue to evolve through thePaleozoic era, diversifying into a wide variety of forms. Many fish of the Paleozoic developed external armor that protected them from predators. The first fish with jaws appeared in the Silurian period, after which many (such as sharks) became formidable marine predators rather than just the prey of arthropods.
Amphibian



Amphibians (class Amphibia, from Amphi- meaning "on both sides" and -bios meaning "life"), are a class of vertebrate animals including animals such as frogs, caecilians, and salamanders. They are characterized as non-amniote ectothermic (or cold-blooded) tetrapods. Most Amphibians undergo metamorphosis from a juvenile water-breathing form to an adult air-breathing form, but some are paedomorphs that retain the juvenile water-breathing form throughout life. Mudpuppies, for example, retain juvenile gills in adulthood. The three modern orders of amphibians are Anura (frogs and toads), Caudata (salamanders and newts), and Gymnophiona (caecilians, limbless amphibians that resemble snakes), and in total they number approximately 6,500 species.Many amphibians lay their eggs in water. Amphibians are superficially similar to reptiles, but reptiles are amniotes, along with mammals and birds. The study of amphibians is called batrachology.
Amphibians are ecological indicators, and in recent decades there has been a dramatic decline in amphibian populations around the globe. Many species are now threatened or extinct.
The earliest amphibians evolved in the Devonian period from lobe-finned fish that used their strong, bony fins to venture onto dry land. They were the top predators in the Carboniferous and Permian periods, but they later faced competition from their descendants, the reptiles, and many lineages were wiped out during the Permian–Triassic extinction. One group, the metoposaurs, remained important predators during the Triassic, but as the world became drier during the Early Jurassic they died out, leaving a handful of relict temnospondyls like Koolasuchus and the modern orders of Lissamphibia.


Reptile
Reptiles originated around 320-310 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, having evolved from advanced reptile-like amphibians that became increasingly adapted to life on dry land. Unlike amphibians, reptiles do not have an aquatic larval stage. As a rule, reptiles are oviparous(egg-laying), although certain species of squamates are capable of giving live birth. This is achieved by either ovoviviparity (egg retention) orviviparity (birth of offspring without the development of calcified eggs). Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms ofplacenta analogous to those of mammals, with some providing initial care for their hatchlings. Extant reptiles range in size from a tiny gecko,Sphaerodactylus ariasae, which can grow up to 1.7 cm (0.6 in) to the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, which may reach 6 m in length and weigh over 1,000 kg.


Bird 
Birds (class Aves) are featheredwingedbipedalendothermic (warm-blooded), egg-layingvertebrate animals. Around 10,000 living species makes them the most speciose class of tetrapod vertebrates. They inhabit ecosystems across the globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Extant birds range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 160 million years (Ma) ago. 


Mammal
Mammals are members of a class of air-breathing vertebrate animals characterised by the possession ofendothermy, hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands functional in mothers with young. Most mammals also possess sweat glands and specialised teeth, and the largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta which feeds the offspring during gestation. The mammalian brain, with its characteristic neocortex, regulates endothermic and circulatory systems, the latter featuring red blood cells lacking nuclei and a large four-chambered heart maintaining the very high metabolism rate they have. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 millimeter (1- to 1.5-inch)Bumblebee Bat to the 33-meter (108-foot) Blue Whale.